the main thing

My logic goes something like this.

We are left with a Word. Not just a word. Many words.

With these words, the God of the universe tells us everything we need to know. Everything.

If there’s something He hasn’t told us, it’s not important. He didn’t leave anything out.

What He has told us is important. After all, this is God speaking.

If He’s told us something once, it’s important. {Read that again.}

If He’s told us that thing twice, it’s perhaps more important.

If He’s told us that thing more than twice, it’s very important.

If He spends many words telling us that thing? Well, then, it’s pretty close to the most important thing.

If He spends more words telling us about that thing than anything else?
You just found the main thing.

Off the top of my head, I’d say the following topics get lots of attention.
CHRIST. CHURCH. DISCIPLESHIP. FAITH. GOD. GOSPEL. GRACE. HEAVEN. HELL. LOVE. MONEY. PEOPLE. RIGHTEOUSNESS. SIN. SPIRIT.

. . . while the following topics are rarely mentioned, relatively speaking. {You know when you have to search for those one or two passages to see what the Bible says about it?}
ANIMALS. CLOTHING. DRINKING. EARTH. EDUCATION. ENTERTAINMENT. FAMILY. FOOD. GOVERNMENT. HEALTH. HOME. MARRIAGE. MUSIC.

Yet wherein do our discussions often lie? Not to mention priorities?

My logic isn’t always logical. But hopefully you catch my drift.

Mainly, I’m thinking we need to keep the main thing the main thing.

[image credit: journeyoftheword.com]


9 thoughts on “the main thing

  1. This is simple, logical, and to the point. I like it. I have one question. Shouldn’t marriage be added to one of the more talked about things. It is mentioned very early in Genesis and it is a main topic, goal, and analogy for Christ and the Church. Also, how we are joined to Christ is our model for how we are joined in marriage and how we ought to live out those relationships. Marriage (the marriage) is quite important.

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    1. I definitely see your point. Don’t get me wrong – marriage is very important. If it’s mentioned in Scripture at all, it’s important. In this post, I am simply observing which topics the Bible addresses at length and which ones it does not.
      Marriage is certainly addressed in several places. If you count every example of a married couple, that probably pushes it into the first category.
      As you said, marriage is a model of the relationship between Christ and the church. So, the Christ-church relationship is the greater point here, not earthly marriage itself. The church continues forever; marriage does not. Spiritual relationships never die; physical ones do.
      I am not suggesting that marriage should not be taken seriously. Nor am I suggesting that marriage is not to be held in high esteem. The Scriptures which do address marriage are “strong.” I’m merely noticing that the Bible doesn’t speak to this issue as much as it does to many other issues. So perhaps we have the potential to idolize earthly marriage and give it more attention than God every intended.
      Hope that helps to clarify my post. Thanks for the question.

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  2. I guess sometimes we focus on the “details” so to speak and the “lesser subjects” because they are the ones that come under attack perhaps the most. The devil is careful how he attacks. If he went after the main things first, he might not make much headway, but going after the details first may change us gradually and crumble us before we even know what’s happening.

    I guess also in a way though, if we *truly* get the main things correct in life, then we should have the details right too. But on the other hand… again, sometimes it’s the details that show us how we really don’t have the main things correct. For instance since marriage is brought up, some may actually think they are think they are righteous or at least not sinning but think they have a great relationship with God when in fact they have so many wrong ideas on marriage and are living deep in sin. That detail shows them how they really don’t have the main things correct.

    This reminds me of the rich young ruler who came to Jesus:

    Mark 10:19-24
    19 Thou knowest the commandments, Do not commit adultery, Do not kill, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Defraud not, Honour thy father and mother.
    20 And he answered and said unto him, Master, all these have I observed from my youth.
    21 Then Jesus beholding him loved him, and said unto him, One thing thou lackest: go thy way, sell whatsoever thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven: and come, take up the cross, and follow me.
    22 And he was sad at that saying, and went away grieved: for he had great possessions.
    23 And Jesus looked round about, and saith unto his disciples, How hardly shall they that have riches enter into the kingdom of God!
    24 And the disciples were astonished at his words. But Jesus answereth again, and saith unto them, Children, how hard is it for them that trust in riches to enter into the kingdom of God!

    Granted everything in that discussion could be considered a “main thing,” but I think you see what I’m saying hehe. He thought he had it right with the main things, but he missed a “detail” and wow what a detail!

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  3. Wow, excellent post! Fantastic point that we should be focused on the things that God is most concerned about. Yes, everything has its place, but we need to prioritize and keep the big picture in view. Great thoughts, thanks for sharing!

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  4. Thanks for starting this discussion, Lydia. I don’t think it’s any coincidence that I stumbled upon this post today. Just this morning in my devotional time I felt the need to focus on “one thing” at a time rather than be distracted by many (good) things. It’s interesting that you would write about the main thing and our need to put our attention there. God is definitely making His point loud and clear and I’m grateful that He used your words to speak to me.

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